Home Again! (Trekking in the Andes: Day 1)

Home Again! (Trekking in the Andes: Day 1)

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“Slow,” responded our guide with brutal honesty, “You are are very slow.”

He had tried to get a way with the politely evasive answer, “Hard to say,” when the woman with the baseball cap and jaunty step had asked him how the pace of our group rated, but she’d persisted. She’d even given him options to choose from, “Would you say that our group’s pace  is pretty average? Is it faster than usual? Is it slower? How would you say our group is doing compared to other groups that you’ve guided?”

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We stopped and looked back towards the rest of our group, many of whom were so far back that we couldn’t see them. Our guide shook his head, “Today we have gone only down, and still you are very slow.” He looked across the river at the switchbacks we’d be climbing in the morning, “Tomorrow we go up.” A vague note of concern in the guide’s voice as he discussed the slowness of the group drew my attention to the position of the sun in the sky… it would be setting soon. Suddenly the guides concern with the slowness of the group became clear.

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Blue agave by the side of the trail as we descended towards the Apurimac River

Although I’d noticed that our group was slow, I hadn’t thought much about it. I’d been soaking up the beautiful and exotic views of the altiplano (high andean desert) with the mountainous cloud forests off in the distance. In short, I’d been lost in the timeless beauty of the Andean mountains…

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A cliff covered with hundreds of bromeliads

Hiking through the altiplano reminded me of trekking through the Sonoran desert on the PCT in California with its dusty trails, distant forest fires, desert scrub, prickly pear cactus, giant blue agave (American agave; an invasive from Mexico and central America), and tall columnar cactus (unlike the columnar cactus in the Sonoran desert, these Peruvian cacti contain mescaline). There was also a succulent that the guide referred to as Inca agave, which was used in Inca times to make cloth and rope (it looked so much like yucca, I couldn’t  believe it was agave; it turns out that it is fourcroya/furcreaea andina).

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Heading into a steep switchback surrounded by cacti

I was also captivated by new-to-me sights, like hundreds of bromeliads growing on the faces of cliffs, and a tree that looked like it was straight out of a Dr. Seuss book (a Ceiba/Kapok tree).

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A Ceiba/Kapok tree with it’s cottony puff balls

When I took a minute to stop to think about it, I realized that it had been taking us (as a group) an awful long time to descend the 6 miles (~10km) down to camp. Since we were descending more than 4400ft (~1350m) and it was only day 1 of a 12-day trek, I didn’t mind going a bit slower than usual (it would really suck to sprain an ankle or twist a knee on a loose rock on day 1)!

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Trail sign saying, “Danger Landslide Zone,” indicating no headphone use

Despite the large drop in elevation, the trail was mostly nicely, if steeply, graded switchbacks and since we were only carrying day packs we should have been able to descend it fairly quickly. Our itinerary suggested it would take us about 3 hrs to descend, which seemed like it would have been an entirely reasonable pace of about 2 miles/hr (~3km/hr).

Instead, we’d started hiking at 11:30 and when we stopped for lunch 3 hours later we were about halfway to our riverside campsite. By 3:30 we were hiking again, but by 5, when the guide was forced to admit that we were slow, we were still at least an hour away from camp.

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The trail disappearing off into the distance

The mountains were starting to glow with the low angle light of the golden hour and the Apurimac river, a headwater river of the Amazon, was sparkling with the late afternoon light… I desperately wanted to be closer to those amazing waters before the light completely disappeared from the valley. The guide, ever perceptive, noticed that I was getting a bit antsy and said,  “I’m going to wait here for the rest of the group. You see those tents down there by the river? That’s us. The three of you can keep going to camp if you want, just don’t cross the bridge over there.”

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The little voice inside my head danced, and shouted, “Freedom!” For the first time all day I set off at my normal pace, stretching out my legs, and enjoying my full stride. There was so much more oxygen here below 6000 ft (~1830m) than there was in Cusco at 11,000 ft (~3400m) that I felt like I was flying. The trail into and out of the canyon kept reminding me of the long, hot, descent into Belden on the PCT (aided by a similar looking ascent immediately afterwards), and my body was feeling like my thru-hiker body as I danced around the rocks, and whipped around the switchbacks.

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The turquoise waters of the Apurimac River at sunset

I loved it! The steep canyon walls lit with the orange glow of the sunset, the sparkling turquoise waters below headed on their amazing journey to the amazon, and many miles of open trail ahead of me on my journey to Machu Piccu… I was in the mountains, I’d found my happy place, I was home again!!

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A sunset view of the bridge over the Apurimac River

I ran out of trail and sunlight at about the same time, but my face remained lit up by a giant smile as I settled into camp. Not only was I in this amazing place, but when I arrived in camp my tent was already set up for me, hot chocolate and cookies were waiting for me, AND I didn’t have to make dinner or wash dishes?!! It seemed to good to be true. The horsemen (there were 3 for our group) even brought us wash clothes, basins, and soap to wash up with.

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After we all arrived and got cleaned up, we reconvened in the dining tent. Seated around the table were the 8 people of our fellowship: the guide, the Finnish writer, the 5 friends from Wisconsin, and me. As we drank cocoa and tea the most amazing meal materialized before us, thanks to the men behind the curtain, our two amazing cooks. There was no denying that our group was slow, it had taken us 6.5 to 7 hours of hiking to descend 6 miles on relatively decent terrain, but as we all sat around eating our gourmet dinner on the banks of the Apurimac river, there was nothing but smiles all around.

My tent at the Playa Rosalinda campsite

Day 1: Capuyiloc to Playa Rosalinda (By the numbers)

  • Total Distance: ~6 miles (~10km)
  • Starting time: ~11:30 am
    • Capuyiloc: 9,561 ft (2915m)
      • Groups Oxygen Saturation: 91.1±1.5 (n=8)
  •  Finish time: ~7:00 pm
    •  Playa Rosalinda/Apurimac River: 5,084ft (1550m)
      • Groups Oxygen Saturation: 94.4±0.8 (n=7)
  • Temperatures: Daytime (~100°F/~40°C), Nighttime (88°F /31°C)
  • Total Elevation: -4400ft (-1350m)

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–Thirsting for Adventure (Trekking in Peru: Day 2)–

 

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7 Movies to Watch Instead of ‘A Walk in the Woods’

I didn’t love the movie ‘A Walk in the Woods… In fact, most people didn’t… Overall, I think that going for a short walk or hike would have been a much better use of my 104 minutes. However, there are days (typically the cold and rainy ones) when I don’t want to go outside and decide to stay inside and watch a movie. Since I’m a thru-hiker (LT ’98, AT ’13, PCT ’14) and have grown up loving the outdoors, it’s probably not a surprise that I gravitate towards movies featuring outdoor adventures and travel. Here are some of the movies about long walks that I’d recommend watching instead of ‘A Walk in the Woods’ (most are available on Netflix or Amazon):

  1. If you’re looking for a movie about the Appalachian Trail, check out:
    • The Appalachian Trail (7/10)
      • This National Geographic documentary explores scenery, wildlife, and some of the current issues facing the Appalachian Trail.
      • Genre: Documentary
      • Release Date: 2009
  2. If you’re looking for a buddy movie involving a long walk and fantastical adventures, check out:
    • Lord of the Rings (9/10)
      • This series of three fantastical adventure movies features two childhood friends, Frodo and Samwise, as they embark upon an epic journey that will shape their lives forever… I absolutely loved these movies, especially the first one, The Fellowship of the Ring (2001).
      • Genres: Adventure, Fantasy
      • Release Dates: 2001, 2002, and 2003, Director: Peter Jackson
      • Starring: Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen, and Sean Astin
  3.  If you’re looking for a movie about a long walk and issues associated with aging and retirement, check out:
    • Redwood Highway (8/10)
      • A drama/comedy about a stubborn older woman (in her ’70s) that decides to walk from her retirement home to her granddaughter’s wedding… Redwood Highway deals with some of the complex issues associated with aging and retirement, and has a more realistic approach to walking than A Walk in the Woods… It even manages to do it with a side of comedy! I would watch it again.
      • Genre: Drama
      • Release Date: April 5, 2013, Director: Gary Lundgren
      • Starring: Shirley Knight, Tom Skerritt, Danforth Comins
  4. If you’re looking for a movie about a long walk, mid-life crises, and personal transformation, check out:
    • The Way (8/10)
      • A drama about a middle-aged man who goes for a long walk on “El Camino de Santiago” as he deals with the death of his estranged son. The Way is a movie about walking, friendship, midlife crises, and personal transformation.
      • Genres: Adventure, Comedy, Drama
      • Release Date: October 7, 2011 (USA), Director: Director: Emilio Estevez
      • Starring: Martin Sheen, Emilio Estevez, Deborah Kara Unger
  5. If you’re looking for a movie about long walks, youthful arrogance, and personal transformation, check out:
    • Seven Years in Tibet (8/10)
      • A drama about the personal transformation of an arrogant mountaineer who ends up befriending the Dalai Lama.
      • Genres: Adventure, Biography, Drama, History, and War
      • Release Date: October 10, 1997 (USA), Director: Jean-Jacques Annaud
      • Starring: Brad Pitt, David Thewlis, BD Wong
  6. If you’re looking for a movie about long walks, childhood perseverance, and Australian history check out:
    • Rabbit-Proof Fence (9/10)
      • A drama about three young aboriginal girls that escape from a government camp and go on a long walk trying to get home… The story is tragic, haunting, and yet uplifting…
      • Genres: Adventure, Biography, Drama, and History
      • Release Date: January 31, 2003 (USA), Director: Philip Noyse
      • Starring: Everlyn Sampi, Tianna Sansbury, Kenneth Branagh
  7. If you’re looking for a movie about hikers, friendship, and the beauty of the High Sierras, check out:
    • Mile, Mile and a Half (9/10)
      • A documentary about a group of friends (5 artists) that set out to hike the John Muir Trail and attempt to capture the beautiful sights, sounds, and images of the High Sierra along the way… The film is well done, breathtakingly gorgeous, and captures some of the thoughts, pain, and emotions of people that hike hundreds of miles of trail for the pure joy and beauty of it. Sure, there are bits that annoy me, but mostly it makes me nostalgic for one of the most beautiful sections of the Pacific Crest Trail… Overall I loved it and highly recommend it.
      • Genre: Documentary
      • Release Date: June 1, 2013, Directors: Jason M. Fitzpatrick, Ric Serena

In addition to movies about long walks, I love watching movies (of all genres except suspense/horror) about the outdoors and outdoor adventures. Here are some of my other favorites (by genre):

  • Documentaries:
    • Desert Runners (9/10): An awesome documentary about desert ultra-marathons and the people that run them. (Available on Netflix)
    • Chasing Ice (10/10): A stunningly beautiful documentary about glaciers, the environment, and global warming. Watch it! (Available on Netflix)
    •  Touching the Void (10/10): A powerfully moving docu-drama about two mountaineers and their struggle to overcome disaster. (Available on Netflix)
    • Happy People (7/10): A people-focused documentary that I enjoyed once I finally got over the title and the slow beginning… Once I got sucked into it, I enjoyed it, but it isn’t a movie that I watch over and over again. (Available on Netflix)
    • McConkey (9/10): An exciting, and sobering, look at the life and adventures of Shane McConkey, an influential skier, base-jumper, and adventure athlete. (If you like McConkey, check out Senna, which is about a Brazilian Formula 1 Race Car Driver.)
  • Dramas:
    • Tracks (8/10): A drama about one woman’s long walk through the Australian desert. It deals with themes of solitude, adventure, wanderlust, and the bonds that she forms both with people, and animals, along the way. The content in the movie is great, and as a solo adventurer, there were many parts of the movie that I could really relate to, but the pacing was a little slow. (Available on Netflix)
    • A scene from Tracks
    • Wild (~8/10): A drama about a woman’s personal growth and development as she hikes a long section of the Pacific Crest Trail. I watched this movie on its opening night, right after I completed my own solo Pacific Crest Trail hike in 2014… Though the main characters journey was in many ways very different than my own, many of the scenes and her experiences on the trail really resonated with me. I thought the movie was powerful and well done, and was better than the book… I hope to watch it again so that I can write-up a more in-depth review.
    •  Cast Away (7/10): A drama about a man marooned on a desert island. It deals with themes of solitude, the wilderness, personal growth and development, and re-entry into society. As a solo thru-hiker there were many aspects of the movie that I identified with, like making friends with inanimate objects, adjusting to a different kind of reality, and they trying to figure out how you fit back into the old reality when it’s all over…
    •  A River Runs Through It (6/10): A coming-of-age drama about one man’s life fishing along a river. It deals with themes of family, friendship, rebellion, and wilderness. I thought the content was good, the scenery amazing, but the pacing was very slow!
  • Comedies: (I really struggled trying to come up with good comedies about the outdoors… What are your favorites?)
    • Ice Age (9/10): An animated family comedy about a group of animals going on a long walk and the adventures they encounter along the way.
    • Crocodile Dundee (7/10): An outdoor adventure comedy that I loved as a kid… Watching it as an adult, it suffers from a lot of the challenges associated with race, culture, and gender of it’s era and genre, but I still managed to have fun watching it. (Available on Netflix) 

Here are some other outdoor adventure movies I’ve seen, but not recently enough to rate:

  • 127 Hours (2010): I watched it when it first came out, and I thought that it was a gruesome, yet gripping movie that contained some very strong and important messages… “Make Sure Someone Has Your Itinerary and Knows Where You Are!”… It thought it was an excellent film, definitely worth seeing, but not something that I want to  watch again… I felt similarly about Schindler’s List.
  • The Blair With Project (1999): I tried to watch this movie in the theater when it first came out, but the visuals made me intensely motion sick and I ended up puking in the bathroom the whole time… It’s one of the few times I’ve had to walk out of a theater!
  • The Land Before Time (1988): An animated coming-of-age movie about a group of dinosaurs setting of on a journey to find a new life. I loved this movie when it first came out!
  • Cliffhanger (1993): Cliffhanger is a classic action moving starring Sylvester Stallone. I watched this movie when it first came out, and some of the images from it are vividly seared into my memory… I thought it was good at the time… I wonder what I would think of it now?

Hiking/Outdoor Adventure Movies I’ve heard good things about, but haven’t seen yet (or saw so long ago I don’t remember them):

  • Adventure/Drama:
    • Never Cry Wolf (1983), The Bear (1988), Jeremiah Johnson (1972)- starring Robert Redford, Dances with Wolves (1990), White Fang (1991), Southbounders (2005), Legends of the Fall (1994), Last of the Mohicans (1992),Walkabout (1971), Into the Wild (2007)
  • Action/Adventure:
    • The Edge (1997), Alive (1993), The Grey (2011), K2 (1991), The River Wild (1994)
  • Comedy:
    • The Great Outdoors (1998)
  • Documentary:
    • Alone in the Wilderness (2004)
  • Thriller:
    • Deliverance (1972), The Loneliest Planet (2011), White Water Summer (1987)

What are your favorite movies about hiking and the Outdoors? Which movies about outdoor adventures have I forgotten in my lists? Are there movies that you’d recommend that I haven’t watched yet, or that I should re-watch? Leave a comment below and let me know!

 

 

 

 

New England’s 4000 Footers

Mt. Katahdin, October 3, 2013

Mt. Katahdin, Maine: October 3, 2013

New England’s 4000-footers showcase some of the most rugged trails and most spectacular views in the Northeast! So far, I’ve climbed 14/14 Maine 4000 footers, 35/48 New Hampshire 4000 footers, and 5/5 Vermont 4000 footers. As I continue hiking the peaks of the Northeast, I will post the links and pictures from my 4000 footer adventures here! If you have any questions about which mountains, trails, and hikes are my favorites, or if you have suggestions about additional information you’d like me to share, please leave a comment below!

Maine’s 4000 Footers (14/14): I completed 14/4 Maine 4000 footers during my 2013 Appalachian Trail Thru-Hike. The remaining Maine 4000 footers I need to hike are: Hamlin Peak of Katahdin and North Brother, both in Baxter State Park, and Mount Abraham and Mount Reddington in the Carrabassett Valley.

  1. Katahdin, Baxter Peak – Baxter State Park, on AT (Completed: October 4, 2013: AT Day 149)
  2. Katahdin, Hamlin Peak – Baxter State Park
  3. Sugarloaf – Carrabassett Valley, 0.6 miles from AT (Completed: September 22, 2013: AT Day 137)
  4. Crocker Mountain – Carrabassett Valley, on AT (Completed: September 23, 2013: AT Day 138)
  5. Old Speck – Mahoosuc Range, 0.3 miles from AT (Completed: September 17, 2013: AT Day 132)
  6. North Brother – Baxter State Park
  7. Bigelow, West Peak – Bigelow Range, on AT (Completed: September 24, 2013: AT Day 139)
  8. Saddleback – Rangeley Range, on AT (Completed: September 20, 2013: AT Day 135)
  9. Bigelow, Avery Peak – Bigelow Range, on AT (Completed: September 24, 2013: AT Day 139)
  10. Mount Abraham – Carrabassett Valley (1.7 miles off of the AT)
  11. South Crocker Mountain – Carrabassett Valley, on AT (Completed: September 23, 2013: AT Day 138 )
  12. Saddleback Horn – Rangeley Range, on AT (Competed: September 20, 2013: AT Day 135)
  13. Mount Reddington – Carrabassett Valley
  14. Spaulding – Carrabassett Valley, 150ft from AT (Completed: September 22, 2013: AT Day 137)

Mount Washington, NH: February 2015

Mount Washington, NH: February 2015

New Hampshire (35/48): I hiked 20/48 New Hampshire 4000 footer during my AT 2013 thru-hike (some of them required short side-trips). 15/48 I completed with friends and family during day-hikes and shorter backpacking trips, but need to verify dates of those hikes (luckily mom has kept track, so I’ll have to check in with her). I guess that leaves 13 NH 4000 footers for me to explore for the first time!!

  1. Washington, on AT (Completed: September 10, 2013: AT Day 125)
  2. Adams, 0.3 miles from AT (Completed with mom, date=?)
  3. Jefferson, 0.3 miles from AT (Completed with mom, date=?)
  4. Monroe, 0.3 miles from AT (Completed: September 9, 2013, AT Day 124)
    • Gorgeous 360 degree views!
  5. Madison, on AT (Completed: September 11, 2013, AT Day 126)
    • Gorgeous 360 degree views!
  6. Lafayette, on AT (Completed: September 7, 2013, AT Day 122)
  7. Lincoln, on AT (Completed: September 7, 2013, AT Day 122)
  8. South Twin, on AT (Completed: September 8, 2013, AT Day 123)
  9. Carter Dome, on AT (Completed: September 14, 2013, AT Day 129)
  10. Moosilauke, on AT (Completed: September 5, 2013, AT Day 120)
    • Sunrise/Sunset: July 2015: Trip Report
  11. Eisenhower, 0.3 miles from AT (Completed: September 9, 2013, AT Day 124)
    • Gorgeous 360 degree views of Presidential Range
  12. North Twin, 1.3 miles from the AT (date? with Josh)
  13. Carrigain (date?: with Josh)
  14. Bond (date?: with family)
  15. Middle Carter, on AT (Completed: September 14, 2013, AT Day 129)
  16. West Bond (date?: with family)
  17. Garfield, on AT (Completed: September 7, 2013, AT Day 122)
  18. Liberty (date?: with Josh)
  19. South Carter, on AT (Completed: September 14, 2013, AT Day 129)
  20. Wildcat, A Peak, on AT (Completed: September 13, 2013, AT Day 128)
  21. Hancock (date?: with Josh)
  22. South Kinsman, on AT (Completed: September 6, 2013, AT Day 121)
  23. Field
  24. Osceola
  25. Flume (date? with Josh)
  26. South Hancock (date? with Josh)
  27. Pierce, < 0.1 from the AT,  (Completed: September 9, 2013, AT Day 124 )
  28. North Kinsman, on AT (Completed: September 6, 2013, AT Day 121)
  29. Willey
  30. Bondcliff (date?: with family)
  31. Zealand (date?: with mom)
  32. North Tripyramid (date?: with Josh)
  33. Cabot
  34. East Osceola
  35. Middle Tripyramid
  36. Cannon
  37. Hale
  38. Jackson, on AT (Completed: September 9, 2013, AT Day 124)
  39. Tom
  40. Wildcat, D Peak, on AT (Completed: September 13, 2013, AT Day 128)
  41. Moriah (date: with Josh)
  42. Passaconaway
  43. Owl’s Head (date?: with mom)
    • No views, isolated wooded summit
  44. Galehead (date?: with mom)
  45. Whiteface
  46. Waumbek
  47. Isolation (date?: with Josh)
  48. Tecumseh

Sunset at Lakes of the clouds, NH

Sunset at Lakes of the clouds, NH

Vermont (5/5): I hiked 1/5 Vermont 4000 footers during my 2013 AT thru-hike, however, I hiked all 5/5 during my 1998 end-to-end hike of the Long Trail.

  1. Mount Mansfield, on Long Trail (Completed: August 1998)
  2. Killington Peak, on AT, on Long trail (Completed: August 1998, and August 2013)
  3. Camel’s Hump, on Long Trail (Completed: August 1998)
  4. Mount Ellen, on Long Trail (Completed: August 1998)
  5. Mount Abraham, on Long Trail (Completed: August 1998)